Using ICT to create a public information system - lesson plan

QCA Unit  ICT at KS 3, Unit 8:  Using ICT to Create a Public Information System.Session 1.
Year Group  Year 7 Number in class 30
Time for lesson  1 hour (each session). No. of computers 15

 

1.1a Using a range of ICT tools in a purposeful way to tackle questions, solve problems and create ideas and solutions of value.

1.1b Exploring and using new ICT tools as they become available.

1.1.c Applying ICT learning in a range of contexts ad in other areas of learning, work and life.

2.1a Consider systematically the information needed to solve a problem, complete a task or answer a question, and explore how it will be used.

2.1c Collect and enter quantitative and qualitative information, checking its accuracy.

2.2c Test predictions and discover patterns and relationships, exploring, evaluating and developing models by changing their rules and values.

2.2d Design information systems and suggest improvements to existing systems.

2.2e Use ICT to make things happen by planning, testing and modifying a sequence of instructions, recognising where a group of instructions needs repeating, and automating frequently used processes by constructing efficient procedures that are fit for purpose.

Aims/Learning Outcomes: pupils will collate data from a range of sources for the construction of a daily information service on a chosen topic. Suitable topics might be the weather or other environmental phenomenon. Alternatively, topics such as financial performance, interest rates or share prices could be feasible.

The final choice of topic will depend on the resources available. Therefore this plan includes guidance for a range of possible topics.

All:. Learn integrated methods of data capture, and their limitations. Develop an information system that will meet the requirements of a particular audience, i.e., daily weather report Learn how basic sensors work and how the resultant data may be transmitted and stored. How to download and secure primary data.

How data may be secured in a ROM and may be downloaded in a specified format.

Understand that data from  remote sensors is generated in particular formats, and  that these have to be presented in a way which is accessible to the target  audience.

Some: As above,  and design more  advanced features of  public information services.

Resources: PowerPoint, multimedia software, internet connection, examples of existing information systems, weather sensor equipment, which will need to be networked to the class computer terminals.

Key Points: remind the class that the data they collect from sensors will be primary data, their interpretation will be secondary.

Differentiation: By learning outcome, and differentiated tasks activities. Group work at different levels where the tasks are simplified/extended  in terms of content and/or language for specific groups. Those in this class who are in lower ability Maths groups to be aided by teaching support staff as available.

Introduction: explain to  the whole class that they are going construct a public information system capable of delivering daily updates of information in a given field. Discuss examples of these available in the public sphere, such as the weather or other environmental phenomenon. This will introduce the class to the principles of remote sensing, employing two different examples, i.e. the measurement of wind speed by an anemometer through light, and the measurement of rainfall. Alternatively, other  topics include financial performance, interest rates,  or share prices all of which could be feasible topics.

Key points: Discuss the idea that all of these types of systems have something in common, i.e. they rely on the capture of data from external sources, which is then edited, integrated, and presented in an accessible way. Look at the example of weather forecasting. Show a related video presentation such as INSERT if possible. So, what are the important stages in  the transfer of information, i.e.,

Data capture: this is achieved by various means, i.e. atmospheric sensors which capture positivist data like temperature, humidity, pressure, wind speed, rainfall etc. Also, visual imagery is captured by weather satellites and purposefully sited weather stations.

However, large amounts of data may be imported into spreadsheets from other sources, such as websites. To show how this may be done, direct the class to the interactive whiteboard and open an Excel  worksheet. Reduce this window and open the internet browser; go to the Met Office 5 day weather forecast for an area of your choice, i.e. London. Highlight and copy the 5 day forecast table. Re-open the Excel workbook and  position the cell cursor in cell A1. Click paste and the table will appear in EdExcel.

Time Weather Temp Wind Direction Wind Speed Gust Visibility

0

Cloudy 10 °C S 21 mph 37 mph Very Good

300

Cloudy 10 °C S 25 mph 43 mph Good

600

Cloudy 9 °C SSW 23 mph 45 mph Moderate

900

Fine 7 °C WSW 11 mph Very Good

1200

Fine 8 °C SW 11 mph Very Good

1500

Cloudy 9 °C WSW 13 mph 24 mph Very Good

1800

Rain 6 °C WSW 14 mph 29 mph Very Good
Night Rain 3 °C SW 16 mph 26 mph Good

 

Look at some examples of the data captured by these means, present them to the whole class. Can they see any problems with the use of the data? Typical issues would be…

Large amounts of information, with no clear meaning. Because measurements would be taken constantly, there would be broad fields of data which would need to be edited and collated.

Data is recorded and explained in technical languages. The capture of weather data, for example, has to be carried out by specialist technicians, and their professional terminology would not be easily understood by the public/audience.

Multiple sources of information, with no clear means of integrating them. Information is being gathered by different organisations in different places, and at different times. Unless it is integrated at some point, there is no way of using it effectively.

Data editing: how much of the available data should actually be used?

Data presentation: how can potentially complex information be presented to an audience which is interested, but not necessarily informed enough to extract information in its scientific form?

Main Activities:

1. Focus on one type of public information system, for example weather forecasts. Look at different examples of presentation from online and hard copy formats. Make a record of the different ways in which data is presented, i.e. images, graphics, graphs, tables, and texts. Make a class record of the collective findings.

2. Ask the class to identify the technologically-derived  sources of information, such as satellite receiving stations,   automated weather stations, light and temperature sensors, cameras, and internet weather data.

3. What is the difference between primary and secondary data in the context of these kinds of reports?

4. Make a flow chart of the linked activities which would need to be carried out to create a weather presentation, i.e., design of the project, capture of data, editing, assimilation, design of the presentation, and publication.

Plenary:  Get the groups to report the contents of their flow charts, assimilate this data into a shared class version. Discuss the issues which might arise in the construction of an actual presentation, i.e. explore two factors,

1.) The needs of the audience.

2.) The constraints of the available systems and software.

Level 3.

Pupils use ICT to save information and to find and use appropriate stored information, following straightforward lines of enquiry. They use ICT to generate, develop, organise and present their work. This requirement will be met by the use of appropriate software to use and adapt a public information system.

They share and exchange their ideas with others. They use sequences of instructions to…achieve specific outcomes. This requirement will be met through working in pairs and in group/class discussions about best practice in respect of the public information system design process.

They make appropriate choices when using ICT based models or simulations to help them find things out and solve problems. They describe their use of ICT and its use outside school. This will be achieved through the appropriate choice of public information system design, and through discussion of school-based ICT work during homework tasks.

Level 4.

Pupils add to, amend and combine different forms of information from a variety of sources. They use ICT to present information in different forms and show they are aware of the intended audience and the need for quality in their presentations. This requirement will be met by achievement of this lesson’s objectives, i.e. the integration of text, image and graphics  in a public information system.

Level 5

Pupils select the information they need for different purposes, check its accuracy and organise it in a form suitable for processing. They use ICT to structure, refine and present information in different forms and styles for specific purposes and audiences. This requirement could be met by the compilation of data from sensors or remote sources, and the independent assessment of their meaning, integrity and value.

They exchange information and ideas with others in a variety of ways…They create sequences of instructions to control events, and understand the need to be precise when framing and sequencing instructions. They understand how ICT devices with sensors can be used to monitor and measure external events. This requirement could be met by the import and use of data from a weather sensor or similar device.

They explore the effects of changing the variables in an ICT based model. They discuss their knowledge and experience of using ICT and their observations of its use outside school. They assess the use of ICT in their work and are able to reflect critically in order to make improvements in subsequent work. This requirement could be met by modelling the effects of changes in temperature, average temperatures over various periods, and/or sunshine, rainfall, wind speeds etc.

They exchange information and ideas with others in a variety of ways, including using email. They create sequences of instructions to control events, and understand the need to be precise when framing and sequencing instructions. They understand how ICT devices with sensors can be used to monitor and measure external events. They explore the effects of changing the variables in an ICT based model. They discuss their knowledge and experience of using ICT and their observations of its use outside school. They assess the use of ICT in their work and are able to reflect critically in order to make improvements in subsequent work.

Source: Essay UK - http://islam.business/guides/lesson-plans/ict-public-information-system.php


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